RainSoft of Kansas City – RainSoft Water Treatment Stops Hard Water Scale Build-up

RainSoft of Kansas City, an authorized RainSoft Dealer

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RainSoft water conditioning and water softening systems soften and polish the water used throughout your home. Soaps and shampoos rinse out more completely, leaving skin and hair cleaner and more residue free. Water conditioners allow you to use less soap, and your water-using appliances will last longer without that scale build-up present in hard water.

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RainSoft of Kansas City – What is Safe Drinking Water and Other Water FAQs


15480 College Blvd
LenexaKS 66219

(913) 322-0724

RainSoft of Kansas City, an authorized RainSoft Dealer.

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Drinking Water FAQ from the CDC

Frequently Asked Questions

General

Where does my drinking water come from?
The drinking water that is supplied to our homes comes from either surface water or ground water. Surface water collects in streams, rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. Ground water is water located below the ground where it collects in pores and spaces within rocks and in underground aquifers. We obtain ground water by drilling wells and pumping it to the surface.Public water systems provide water from surface and ground water for public use. Water treatment systems are either government or privately-held facilities. Surface water systems withdraw water from the source, treat it, and deliver it to our homes. Ground water systems also withdraw and deliver water, but they do not always treat it. For more information on public water systems, visit CDC’s Public Water Systems page. For more information on how public water systems treat water, visit CDC’s Water Treatment page.

A private well uses ground water as its water source. Owners of private wells and other individual water systems are responsible for ensuring that their water is safe from contaminants. For more information on private wells and individual water systems, visit CDC’s Private Wells page.

Public Water Systems

What type of health issues can be related to water quality?
The presence of certain contaminants in our water can lead to health issues, including gastrointestinal illness, reproductive problems, and neurological disorders. Infants, young children, pregnant women, the elderly, and immunocompromised persons may be especially at risk for becoming ill after drinking contaminated water. For example, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Federal law requires that systems reduce certain contaminants to set levels, in order to protect human health.
How do I know that the water in my home is safe to drink?
The United States Environmental Protection AgencyExternal Web Site Icon (EPA) is responsible for making sure that public water supplies within the United States are safe. In 1974, Congress passed the Safe Drinking Water ActExternal Web Site Icon. This law sought to protect the nation’s public drinking water supply by giving EPA authority to set the standardsExternal Web Site Icon for drinking water quality and oversee the states, localities, and water suppliers who implement those standardsExternal Web Site Icon. In 1986 and 1996, the law was amended to protect drinking water and its sources, which include rivers, lakes, reservoirs, springs, and ground water wells.
How do contaminants (germs and chemicals) get into my drinking water?
There can be many sources of contamination of our water systems. Here is a list of the most common sources of contaminants:

  • Naturally occurring chemicals and minerals (for example, arsenic, radon, uranium)
  • Local land use practices (fertilizers, pesticides, livestock, concentrated animal feeding operations)
  • Manufacturing processes
  • Sewer overflows
  • Malfunctioning wastewater treatment systems (for example, nearby septic systems)
Many contaminants that pose known human health risks are regulated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). EPA makes sure that water meets certain standards, so you can be sure that high levels of contaminants are not in your water.
Who do I need to contact to find out more information about water quality in my area?
Every community water supplier must provide an annual report, sometimes called a Consumer Confidence Report, or “CCR,” to its customers. The report provides information on your local drinking water quality, including the water’s source, contaminants found in the water, and how consumers can get involved in protecting drinking water.

How often does our public water system test our drinking water?
Frequency of drinking water testing depends on the number of people served, the type of water source, and types of contaminants. Certain contaminants are tested for more frequently than others, as set forth by the Safe Drinking Water ActExternal Web Site Icon. You can find out about levels of regulated contaminants in your treated water for the preceding calendar year in your annual Consumer Confidence ReportExternal Web Site Icon (CCR).Learn more about your CCR and water quality in your area.

What common contaminants are included in this testing?
The EPA sets standards and regulations for the presence and amount of over 90 different contaminants in public drinking water, including E.coli, Salmonella, and Cryptosporidium species. More information regarding the specific contaminants and maximum contaminant levels can be found on the EPA’s website (Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List and Regulatory DeterminationsExternal Web Site Icon).
The complete CDC FAQ page.

RainSoft Conditioning Products

RainSoft water conditioning and drinking water systems are designed to meet a variety of water quality challenges, providing you with effective, affordable water conditioning solutions for achieving the best possible water quality for your home.Our water conditioning systems incorporate our proprietary EC4 technology, a system that learns how your family uses water and adjusts for water consumption and salt usage, allowing your family to save money.

Our drinking water systems provide bottled water quality straight from the faucet. Ultrefiner RO drinking water systems are our premier reverse osmosis systems that utilize advanced technology for better tasting, cleaner water. Hydrefiner drinking water systems are installed under your kitchen sink and use a compressed carbon block filter to better treat and filter bad tastes and odors from your drinking water.

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Tips for Safe Drinking Water

Tips for Safe Drinking Water

Environmental Working Group

Drink plenty of water but avoid bottled water when you can. It pollutes the environment and is often nothing more than tap water. When you must use bottled water, choose brands with high EWG transparency scores (clear labeling) and advanced treatment. Read EWG researchers’ top tips to learn more about how to stay hydrated while reducing your exposure to common drinking water pollutants.

Tap water — learn what’s in it.

Tap water suppliers publish all their water quality tests. Bottled water companies don’t. Read your annual tap water quality report. Look up your city’s water in EWG’s National Tap Water Atlas (www.ewg.org/tap-water). (Private well? Get it tested.)

Filtered tap water — drink it, cook with it.

  • Choose a filter certified to remove contaminants found in your water: www.ewg.org/tap-water/getawaterfilter. Effectiveness varies — read the fine print.
  • Carbon filters (pitcher or tap-mounted) are affordable and reduce many common water contaminants, such as lead and byproducts of the disinfection process used to treat municipal tap water.
  • If you can afford it, install a reverse osmosis filter to remove contaminants that carbon filters can’t eliminate, such as chromium-6, arsenic and perchlorate (rocket fuel).

Filters — change them.

Change your water filters on time. Old filters aren’t safe – they harbor bacteria and let contaminants through.

Bottled water — drink filtered tap water instead.

You can read the bottle label and still not know whether the water is pure or just processed tap water. EWG found 38 contaminants in 10 popular brands.

On the go — carry water in safe containers.

Hard plastic bottles (#7 plastic) can leach a harmful plastics chemical called bisphenol-A (BPA) into water. Carry stainless steel or other BPA-free bottles. Don’t reuse bottled water bottles. The plastic can harbor bacteria and break down to release plastics chemicals.

While pregnant — stay hydrated with safe water.

It’s especially important for women to drink plenty of water during pregnancy. Follow all the tips above and take your doctor’s advice on how much to drink.

For infants — use safe water for formula.

Use filtered tap water for your baby’s formula. If your water is not fluoridated, you can use a carbon filter. If it is, use a reverse osmosis filter to remove the fluoride, because fluoridated water can damage an infant’s developing teeth. If you choose bottled water for your infant, make sure it’s fluoride-free. Learn more at www.ewg.org/babysafe.

Breathe easy — use a whole house water filter.

For extra protection, a whole house carbon filter will remove contaminants from steamy vapors you and your family inhale while showering and washing dishes. Effectiveness varies widely – call the manufacturer for details.

The RainSoft Difference

RainSoft drinking water systems are a simple, cost-effective solution to providing cleaner, better tasting water right from the tap. And don’t forget environmentally friendly! With home water filtration systems from RainSoft, you can get bottled-water quality water, without the bottle. Our premium drinking water systems include:

Ultrefiner II Premium Drinking Water System - advanced home water filtration systems that deliver highly polished “ingredient water” for all kitchen uses.

Hydrefiner Water Filtration Systems - a compressed carbon block filters out bad tastes and odors and reduces harmful contaminants.

15480 College Blvd
LenexaKS 66219

(913) 322-0724

RainSoft of Kansas City, an authorized RainSoft Dealer.


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Water Contamination in Public Water, Check-out the Government Study

Quality of Water from Public-Supply Wells in the United States

by Patricia L. Toccalino and Jessica A. Hopple | USGS

More than 20 percent of untreated water samples from 932 public wells across the nation contained at least one contaminant at levels of potential health concern. About 105 million people – or more than one-third of the nation’s population – receive their drinking water from one of the 140,000 public water systems across the U.S. that rely on groundwater pumped from public wells.

About 105 million people—more than one-third of the Nation’s population—receive their drinking water from one of the 140,000 public water systems across the United States that use groundwater as their source.

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed water-quality conditions in source (untreated) groundwater from 932 public wells, and in source and finished (treated) water from a subset of 94 wells. A greater number of chemical contaminants (as many as 337), both naturally occurring and man-made, were assessed in this study than in any previous national study of public wells.

The objectives of this study were to evaluate (1) the occurrence of contaminants in source water from public wells and their potential significance to human health, (2) whether contaminants that occur in source water also occur in finished water after treatment, and (3) the occurrence and characteristics of contaminant mixtures.

Read the USGS Study

RainSoft Hydrefiner Water Filtration Systems

RainSoft’s compact, economical, carbon block drinking water system tucks neatly under your sink and dispenses a constant supply of purely delicious water through your dedicated RainSoft faucet. Additional photo of the faucet will be provided.

Function

Hydrefiner drinking water filtration systems provide a dependable source of high quality water for drinking, cooking, making coffee and tea’s – just about anything you make with water!

Performance

These RainSoft home water filtration systems utilize a highly compressed carbon block filter made of selected activated carbons to reduce chlorine tastes and odors, as well as other select contaminants. +

Convenience

Installs out-of-sight under the kitchen sink.

Economy

Produces up to 830* gallons of filtered water before cartridge replacement is needed.

Reliability

Unit is built to industry standards and carries a limited lifetime warranty.

+Ask your local RainSoft dealer for a Performance Data Sheet for additional information regarding specific contaminant reduction claims.

*830 gallons with RainSoft Filtergard II faucet. 500 gallons without faucet.

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Check Your Area for Water Contaminants Here

How Safe Is Your Drinking Water?

Original article

To find out if there have been any water violations in your area enter your zip code below.

Click here to find the Consumer Confidence Report for your area. If you have any questions about your drinking water or the any of the reports, call the Safe Drinking Water Hotline: 1-800-426-4791Click herefor more information on the hotline.

Decoding Your Results: The EPA has drinking water standards in place to address more than 90 contaminants that may be found in drinking water. If a contaminant has a drinking water standard, it means that EPA has determined that it may occur in public water supplies, that it may have adverse health effects, and that regulation can provide meaningful health risk reduction.

In setting the drinking water standard for a contaminant, the EPA first estimates what level somebody could drink daily for 70 years without being expected to experience health impacts. In determining this non-enforceable public health goal, the EPA consider effects not just on the general population, but also on people who are more sensitive, like babies and pregnant women.

The EPA then sets the enforceable Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL), the maximum level of the contaminant allowed to be in water, as close to the public health goal as feasible, taking into account its ability to measure the contaminant and treat for it, and also the costs. These standards are set using the best available science and the EPA regularly reviews them to make sure they are up to date.

RainSoft has Solutions to Drinking Water Problems

With two premium drinking water systems, RainSoft water treatment delivers a higher quality and better tasting drinking water experience. Not only will the water from a RainSoft drinking water system in your glass taste distinctly better, but so will all of the food and beverages you make with it.

Ultrefiner reverse osmosis water systems are RainSoft’s premier drinking water system. Using advanced RO technology, the Ultrefiner provides highly polished drinking water that filters out smaller particles that can be missed by less refined drinking water systems.

For out-of-the-way convenience, Hydrefiner drinking water systems deliver a continuous supply of clean, fresh water from right under your sink. Utilizing a compressed carbon-block filter, the Hydrefiner eliminates bad tastes and odors from home drinking water.

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To read what people are say about RainSoft, go to RainSoft-Reviews.

Could Fluoride in Water Be Causing Harm?

Does fluoride in drinking water hurt your brain?

By 
Published August 22, 2012 | FoxNews.com

Back in 2011, the EPA reversed course and lowered the recommended maximum amount of fluoride in drinking water due to data that the levels then being allowed put kids at risk of dental fluorosis–streaking and pitting of teeth due to excessive fluoride, which also puts tooth enamel at risk.

This conclusion was a discordant note amidst all the accolades fluoride had won, starting with the discovery during the 1940s that people who lived near water supplies containing naturally occurring fluoride had fewer cavities in their teeth.   A massive push ensued, with government and industry encouraging cities and towns to add fluoride to water supplies.

Now, questions about the impact of fluoride on mental health are growing and can no longer be ignored.

A recently published Harvard study showed that children living in areas with highly fluoridated water have “significantly lower” IQ scores than those living in areas where the water has low fluoride levels.  In fact, the study analyzed the results of 27 prior investigations and found the following, among other conclusions:

* Fluoride may be a developmental neurotoxicant that affects brain development (in children) at exposures much below those that cause toxicity in adults.

* Rats exposed to (relatively low) fluoride concentrations in water showed cellular changes in the brain and increased levels of aluminum in brain tissue.

Other research studies in animals link fluoride intake to the development of beta-amyloid plaques (the classic finding in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s dementia).

And research on fluoride also has implicated it in changing the structure of the brains of fetuses, negatively impacting the behavioral/neurological assessment scores of newborns and, in animal studies, impairing memory.

This information is very important, from a psychiatric standpoint, because we have witnessed rising rates of attention deficit disorder, major depression, dementia and many other psychiatric illnesses since the 1940s, and because the United States (which fluoridates a much higher percentage of its drinking water than most countries, including European nations) has some of the highest rates of mental disorders in the world–by a wide margin.

It is not clear, of course, that fluoride is responsible wholly, or even in small measure, for these facts, but the connection is an intriguing one, especially in light of the new Harvard study.

Given the available data, I would recommend that children with learning disorders, attention deficit disorder, depression, attention-deficit disorder or other psychiatric illnesses refrain from drinking fluoridated water, and consult a dentist about the most effective way of delivering sufficient fluoride to the teeth directly, while minimizing absorption by the body as a whole–and the brain, specifically.

Read more:

RainSoft Water Q&A

If you have air treatment or water conditioning questions, we have the answer. RainSoft is here to assist you in finding the right solution for your water treatment system concerns or questions. Do you think your city water is good enough without a water softening system? Do you want to know how much sodium is in your drinking water? Or maybe you want to be able to calculate just how much you can gain with RainSoft home water filtration systems?

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Tips to Avoid Heat Injury

Tips to avoid heat-related illness
» Drink plenty of fluids before, during and after practice or games.
» Schedule workouts and practices earlier or later in the day, when the temperatures are cooler.
» Start activity slowly and pick up the pace gradually.
» Wear loose, lightweight and light-colored clothing.
» Monitor a teammate’s condition and have someone do the same for you.
» Provide proper rest periods during and between practice sessions.
» Minimize the amount of equipment and clothing worn by players in hot and humid conditions, particularly during the acclimation period.
» Provide shade.
» Have ice baths available.

Signs of heat-related illness
» Muscle cramping.
» Heat rash.
» Heavy sweating.
» Weakness.
» Fast, weak pulse.
» Cold, pale and clammy skin.
» Nausea or vomiting.
» Fainting.
» Hot, red, dry or moist skin.
» High body temperature (above 103 degrees).
» Possible unconsciousness.

Sources: National Athletic Trainers’ Association (www.nata.org),www.cdc.gov

To read the original article, High school football: Heat, drought put emphasis on hydration, click here.

In your home RainSoft delivers clean, delicious water at the push of a button to help you stay hydrated.

Drought Can Make it Harder to Breathe

7 Surprising Health Effects of Drought

Jul 18, 2012 | 2:31 PM ET | MyHealthNewsDaily Staff

With more than half the U.S. currently in drought, concerns have mounted over the consequences of the arid climate on the country’s crop yields. But droughts have far reaching effects beyond the farm, including many effects on human health, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).Here are seven potential health concerns that occur with drought:

Bad air

Droughts can reduce air quality and compromise the health of people with certain conditions, according to the CDC. During a drought, dry soils and wildfires increase the amount of airborne particles, such as pollen and smoke.

These particles can irritate the airways and worsen chronic respiratory illnesses, such as asthma, the CDC says. Poor air quality can also increase the risk of respiratory infections, such as bacterial pneumonia.

Valley fever

Drought increases the risk of people catching the fungal infection coccidioidomycosis, or valley fever, the CDC says. The disease is transmitted when spores in the soil become airborne and are inhaled. The condition causes a range of symptoms, including fever, chest pain, coughing, rash, and muscle aches, the CDC says.

The condition is more common among people living in the Southwest than other parts of the U.S., but it is relatively rare — one study reported that 0.04 percent of people in Maricopa County, Ariz., were infected in one year.

Germy hands

In a drought, people may feel the need to reduce hand washing and other hygiene practices to conserve water, the CDC says. This may increase the spread of infectious diseases, such as acute respiratory and gastrointestinal illnesses.

“Conservation efforts should not hinder proper sanitation and hygiene,” the CDC says. People can install low-flow faucet aerators to reduce water use while still maintaining proper hygiene, the agency says.

Mental health effects

Those whose livelihood is directly tied to the water supply — including farmers, horticulturalists and nursery owners — may suffer adverse mental health effects during a drought, according to the CDC.

“Financial-related stress and worry can cause depression, anxiety, and a host of other mental and behavioral health conditions,” the CDC says. Studies have found an increased rate of suicide among people living in farming areas during droughts, the agency says.

Unhealthy eating

Reduced rainfall can limit the growing season for farmers, and further reduce crop yields by creating ideal conditions for insect infestations that damage crops. This can bring increases in food prices, or shortages of certain foods, potentially leading to malnutrition, the CDC says. Read the complete article at myhealthnewsdaily.com

RainSoft Air and Water Conditioning Products

RainSoft air purification systems treat the entire home, not just one room. Our systems mount directly into the ductwork of your home, providing cleaner, fresher air throughout the entire house. With advanced UV light and ozone lamp technology, the AirMaster Ultra system eliminates airborne contaminants in your home.

RainSoft of Kansas City

Ohio Testing for Arsenic in Water

Ohio to survey arsenic in water

By Spencer Hunt |The Columbus Dispatch Monday July 9, 2012 8:27 AM

A government-led effort to find Ohio’s arsenic “hot spots” in groundwater is taking its first steps in Licking County.

State and county health officials plan to hand out sample bottles to residents at a Tuesday-night workshop and offer free lab tests to determine whether the poisonous metal is in their well water.

The test results will serve a broader public need, providing the U.S. Geological Survey and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency with information on where arsenic could pose a health threat.

“We’re trying to fill in our understanding of which parts of the state and which settings are most vulnerable for arsenic,” said Mary Ann Thomas, a geological survey hydrologist.

Officials say they hope the public can help tailor a statewide program in which Ohioans pitch in to identify where this hazard exists. A second workshop is scheduled for Aug. 14.

“What most people aren’t aware of is at lower levels, it’s not an acute poison, but it can be a chronic one,” said Bob Frey, the health-assessment chief at the Ohio Department of Health.

People who drink water contaminated with arsenic for years are at higher risk of developing skin, liver, bladder and lung cancers. In 2001, the U.S. EPA lowered its safe drinking-water standard for arsenic from a concentration of 50 parts per billion to 10 parts per billion.

Frey said the EPA would have lowered the safe concentration to 0 parts, but arsenic is so common in water across the United States that it would be impossible to get rid of all of it. Under certain chemical conditions, arsenic can leak into groundwater from soil and minerals. read complete article…

Drinking Water Purification Products from RainSoft

Ultrefiner reverse osmosis systems are RainSoft’s premium drinking water systems that employ reverse osmosis purification techniques to effectively filter out contaminants such as arsenic, barium, lead and radium. Ultrefiner reverse osmosis systems feature a five step, three filter filtration process that will remove the finer particles that may slip through other drinking water filtration systems. The RainSoft Ultrefiner system is designed to conveniently install beneath your kitchen sink, is built to last and, with a limited lifetime warranty, has no costly plumbing or new pipe installation requirements.

RainSoft of Kansas City

Water by Request Only at Some Restaurants

Are you going to drink that glass of water? Restaurateur launches campaign to conserve precious Texas resource

06.22.12 | 11:13 am

“I wish I could take a picture of every water glass bussed off a table that’s still full or half full,” says Mimi Del Grande.

She is referring to all the water that restaurants waste when they automatically serve patrons water. And she should know. Del Grande is the wife of celebrity chef Robert Del Grande and one of the original partners in Schiller Del Grande Restaurant Group.

Of course she’s not alone, but she is certainly one of the stalwarts when it comes to “free” water.

Last March, some Houston diners got a little schooling in water when 36 local eateries participated in UNICEF’s World Water Week, a fundraising effort for the Tap Project that brings clean water to children around the world. During World Water Week, restaurant patrons were asked to pay $1 for that glass of tap water to help the project and they were informed about the lack of clean drinking water around the world. Nearly one billion people lack access to clean water.

You want tap water? Cough up a buck for charity. Any charity. Because someday, not that far away, it might be you who needs clean drinking water.

I thought that was the greatest thing since the invention of queso, I just was shocked that only 36 out of thousands of local restaurants participated. And I wish it could go on year-round.

You want tap water? Cough up a buck for charity. Any charity. Because someday, not that far away, it might be you who needs clean drinking water.

According to the Texas Water Development Board’s 2012 State Water Plan: “In serious drought conditions, Texas does not and will not have enough water to meet the needs of its people, its businesses, and its agricultural enterprises.”

And even if we don’t face another drought like last year’s, by 2060 the region’s population will almost double while our existing water supplies will be less. The Water Plan contains recommendations at a cost of $12 billion for the Houston area (called Region H) and part of that plan is increased conservation.

“When it was really bad last summer we did ask restaurants to only serve water on request,” says Greater Houston Restaurant Associationexecutive director Katie Clark. “We made a request in our membership newsletter, but we don’t have any policy on it. It’s hard because patrons are just used to the way it’s always been.”

At least in Houston.

In New York City there is a regulation that stipulates water in restaurants is only to be served upon request. Other cities have similar ordinances (Houston does not) but they aren’t always followed.

“Every time I go out to eat anywhere, even in California where they have restrictions, they are pouring water like crazy,” says Del Grande.

“I grew up in a very dry Riverside, California,” she adds. “Where we had droughts all the time. We used to take our used water out to water our plants and it was illegal to wash our cars.” Anyone remember Chinatown, the Jack Nicholson film about the California Water Wars in the ’20s and 30s?

And by the way, Texas is currently battling both Mexico and Oklahoma over water rights.

“Americans think they have a god given right to water on the table,” says Del Grande. “Seventy percent of the world doesn’t have access to enough fresh water. It’s just bad juju.”

So Del Grande instituted a water-on-request policy at all of the Schiller Del Grande restaurants. Some other eateries, like Giacomo’s cibo e vino, have notes on the menu saying water is only served on request, but Del Grande took it a little farther. The menu at Alto Pizzeria reads: “Please help us save our most precious resource. Water served upon request.”

So how’s that working out?

“The backlash I have gotten on this you would not believe,” Del Grande sighs. “Particularly at RDG, the customers were getting really mad at the waiters.”

“The backlash I have gotten on this you would not believe,” Del Grande sighs. “Particularly at RDG, the customers were getting really mad at the waiters.”

Which is why some of her waiters continue to bring big glasses of water whether you ask for it or not.

“You know people who order a glass of ice tea and a glass of water aren’t going to drink all the water,” Del Grande says. “It takes three glasses of water to wash one glass so you’re not wasting one glass, you’re wasting four.”

And yet we continue to do so. Wasting a precious resource that is itself wasting away as droughts get worse, subsidence reduces some of our water sources and our population continues to climb.

So what’s the answer? Education. Del Grande is hoping to produce some YouTube videos and wants to push the effort with other restaurants. She’s so passionate about it she would love to work on the issue fulltime, but she can’t.

So, in the meantime, next time you sit down at a restaurant table, tell your waiter you don’t want tap water. And if the bring it before you can decline, please ask them to recycle the water.

After all, it is one of our most precious resources.

Read more..

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